Catholics, Orthodox, Anglicans and Protestants who changed the world

100 Eminent Christian Scientists (To Believe in God Does Not Make You An Uncultivated)

It is very common nowadays to see many atheists calling “ignorant” and “uneducated” to those who believe in God, as if professing a religion belongs to people without culture.

Some even consider religion to be incompatible with science and therefore deny that a scientist can be a believer. It is, of course, absurd prejudices based on absolute ignorance, precisely on the condition of many eminent scientists. I will limit to mentioning 100 of them from the last 200 years (I could include many more):

  1. Erwin Schrödinger (1887-1961). Austrian physicist. Catholic. Nobel Prize in Physics in 1933 for developing his equation on quantum mechanics.
  2. Louis Pasteur (1822 – 1895). French chemist and bacteriologist. Catholic. He was the pioneer of modern microbiology and developed the rabies vaccine.
  3. Georges Lemaître (1894-1966). Belgian physicist and astronomer. Catholic priest. He proposed the theory of universe expansion and the Big Bang theory about the origin of the universe.
  4. Jérôme Lejeune (1926-1994). French doctor. Catholic, he is in the process of beatification. He is considered the father of modern genetics.
  5. Gregor Mendel (1822-1844). Austrian naturalist. Catholic priest. He is considered the father of Genetics. In 1865 he formulated the Laws of Mendel on the transmission of the genetic inheritance.
  6. Nikola Tesla (1856-1943). Serbian engineer and physicist, nationalized US. Orthodox Christian. He was the inventor of the current use of electric power by alternating current.
  7. Alexander Fleming (1881-1955). British scientist. Catholic. Nobel Prize in Medicine in 1945 for discovering penicillin.
  8. Guillermo Marconi (1874-1937). Italian electrical engineer. Catholic. He was one of the great drivers of long-distance radio transmission.
  9. Santiago Ramón y Cajal (1852-1934). Spanish physician. Catholic. Nobel Prize in Medicine in 1906 for his studies on the nervous system.
  10. Gerty Cori (1896-1957). American biochemistry. Catholic. Nobel Prize in Medicine in 1947 for discovering the mechanism by which glycogen is converted to lactic acid in muscle tissue. She was the first woman to receive this award.
  11. Eric Wieschaus (1947). American biologist. Catholic. Nobel Prize in Medicine in 1995 for his discoveries on the genetic control of embryonic development.
  12. Max Planck (1858-1947). German physicist and mathematician. Protestant. Nobel Prize in Physics in 1918 for the creation of quantum mechanics.
  13. Alexis Carrel (1873-1944). French doctor. Catholic. Nobel Prize in Medicine in 1912 in recognition of his work on vascular suture and transplantation of blood vessels and organs.
  14. Werner Heisenberg (1901-1976). German physicist. Protestant. Nobel Prize in Physics in 1932 for the discovery of allotropic forms of hydrogen.
  15. Karl Landsteiner (1868-1943). Austrian pathologist and biologist. Catholic. Nobel Prize for Medicine in 1930 to discover and typify blood groups.
  16. Peter Grünberg (1939). German physicist. Catholic. Nobel Prize in Physics in 2007 for his discovery of giant magnetoresistance.
  17. Clyde Cowan (1919-1974). American physicist. Catholic. Codescubridor of the neutrino in 1956 next to Frederick Reines. Nobel Prize in Physics in 1995 for his studies on subatomic particles.
  18. Victor Francis Hess (1883–1964). Austrian physicist. Catholic. Nobel Prize in Physics in 1936 for his studies on cosmic rays.
  19. Henri Becquerel (1852-1908). French physicist. Catholic. Nobel Prize in Physics in 1903 next to the marriage Curie “in recognition of his extraordinary services by the discovery of the spontaneous radioactivity”.
  20. Joseph John Thomson (1856-1940). British scientist. Anglican. Nobel Prize in Physics in 1906 for his research on conducting electricity through gases.
  21. Richard Smalley (1848-1945). American chemist. Protestant. Nobel Prize in Chemistry in 1996 for the discovery of fullerenes.
  22. Robert Andrews Millikan (1868-1953). American physicist. Congregationist. Nobel Prize of Physics in 1923 for his investigations on the photoelectric effect and the charge of the electron.
  23. Max Born (1882-1970). German physicist and mathematician. Protestant. Nobel Prize in Physics in 1954 for his works in quantum mechanics.
  24. George Hevesy (1885-1966). Hungarian physicist and chemist, nationalized Swedish. Catholic. Nobel Prize in Chemistry in 1943 for his research on the isotopes used as tracers in the study of the chemical properties of substances.
  25. Niels Bohr (1885-1965). Danish physicist. Protestant. Nobel Prize in Physics in 1922 for his work on atomic structure and radiation.
  26. Brian Kobilka (1955). American Molecular and Cellular Physiologist. Catholic. Nobel Prize in Chemistry in 2012 for the study of receptors coupled to G proteins.
  27. Carlo Rubbia (1934). Italian particle physicist. Christian believer. Nobel Prize in Physics in 1984 for discovering the W and Z particles at CERN.
  28. Albert Claude (1899-1983). Belgian biologist. Catholic. Nobel Prize for Medicine in 1974 for broadening the knowledge of cells.
  29. Werner Arber (1929). Swiss microbiologist. Protestant. Nobel Prize for Medicine in 1978 for his research on restriction enzymes.
  30. Mario Molina (1943). Mexican chemical engineer. Catholic. Nobel Prize in Chemistry in 1995 for being one of the discoverers of the causes of the hole of the Antarctic ozone layer.
  31. Charles Hard Townes (1915-2015). American physicist. Member of the United Church of Christ. Nobel Prize in Physics in 1964 for his fundamental work in the field of quantum electrons.
  32. William Daniel Phillips (1948). American physicist. Methodist. Nobel Prize in Physics in 1997 for his contributions to the field of laser cooling.
  33. John William Strutt (1842-1919). British physicist. Christian believer. Nobel Prize in Physics in 1904 for his research on the density of a good number of gases as well as for the discovery of argon.
  34. Joseph Edward Murray (1919-2012). Doctor and American plastic surgeon. Catholic. He made great contributions to the improvement of organ transplants. He received the Nobel Prize for Medicine in 1990.
  35. Joseph John Thomson (1856-1940). British scientist. Anglican. Nobel Prize in Physics in 1906 for his work on conducting electricity through gases.
  36. Arthur Leonard Schawlow (1921-1999). American physicist. Methodist. Nobel Prize in Physics in 1981 for his contribution to the development of the spectroscopic laser.
  37. Wolfgang Pauli (1900-1958). Austrian nationalized American physicist. An ecstatic Christian. Nobel Prize in Physics in 1946 for his discovery of the Principle of Exclusion.
  38. John Gurdon (1933). British biologist. Anglican. Nobel Prize for Medicine in 2012 for his findings on cloning.
  39. Heinrich Rudolf Hertz (1857-1894). German physicist. Protestant. He discovered the photoelectric effect, the propagation of electromagnetic waves and the ways to produce and detect them.
  40. George Washington Carver (1864-1943). Scientist, mycologist and American botanist. Evangelical Christian. He is famous for his research and promotion of alternative crops to cotton such as peanuts and potatoes.
  41. Edmund Taylor Whittaker (1873-1956). British mathematician. Catholic. He made notable contributions in applied mathematics, mathematical physics, and special function theory.
  42. Howard Atwood Kelly (1858-1943). American Gynecologist. Methodist. He was one of the pioneers of gynecology.
  43. Giuseppe Moscati (1880-1927). Italian physician and scientist. Catholic, was canonized by Pope John Paul II. He graduated with honors with his thesis on “Urogenese of Liver”.
  44. Pierre Teilhard de Chardin (1881-1955). French paleontologist. Catholic, religious of the Society of Jesus. He presented his own theory about evolution, making concepts like the Noosphere and Omega Point.
  45. Takashi Nagai (1908-1951). Japanese physician. Catholic. One of the pioneers in the study of radiology in Japan. He survived the atomic bomb of Nagasaki.
  46. Charles Stine (1882-1954). American chemist. Christian believer. He founded the laboratory in which nylon was invented.
  47. John von Neumann (1903-1957). Hungarian mathematician nationalized US. Catholic. He made great contributions to game theory and general equilibrium theory for economics.
  48. José Gregorio Hernández (1864-1919). Venezuelan doctor and scientist. Catholic and Secular Franciscan, he is in the process of beatification. He introduced the microscope and other scientific instruments in Venezuela, being a great impeller and pioneer of scientific teaching in his country.
  49. Arthur Compton (1892-1962). American physicist. Presbyterian. He discovered the Compton effect of X-ray photons.
  50. Theodosius Dobzhansky (1900-1975). Ukrainian geneticist. Orthodox Christian. He is one of the founders of the second wave of modern evolutionary synthesis.
  51. Arthur Stanley Eddington (1882-1944). British astrophysicist. Quaker. Diffuser of the Theory of Relativity of Eisntein in Great Britain. He showed that the energy inside the stars was carried by radiation and convection.
  52. Pierre Lecomte du Noüy (1883-1947). Biophysicist and French mathematician. Christian believer. He invented a tensiometer to measure the surface tension of liquids and a microviscosimeter for the study of the serum.
  53. Stanley László Jáki (1924-2009). Hungarian physicist. Catholic priest. He received the Lecompte du Noüy Prize in 1970 and the Templeton Prize in 1987.
  54. Buzz Aldrin (1930). Engineer, Doctor of Science and American astronaut. Presbyterian. He was the second person to step on the Moon, in 1969.
  55. Owen Gingerich (1930). American astronomer. Christian believer. Great scientific disseminator, directed the committee of the International Astronomical Union for the definition of planet.
  56. Michał Heller (1934). Polish physicist. Catholic priest. He has worked on the unification of general relativity and quantum mechanics, multiversal theories and geometric methods in relativistic physics.
  57. Russell Stannard (1931). British physicist. Christian believer. In 1998 Queen Elizabeth II appointed him Officer of the Order of the British Empire for his contributions to physics, Open University and popularization of science.
  58. Karl Stern (1906-1975). Canadian neurologist and psychiatrist. Catholic. He did research on neuropathology and psychoanalysis.
  59. Charles Coulson (1910-1974). Mathematician and British chemist. Methodist. He was a pioneer in the application of quantum theory of valence to problems of molecular structure, dynamics and reactivity.
  60. Arthur Peacocke (1924-2006). ritish biochemist. Anglican Priest. He was a pioneer in investigating the principles of physical chemistry of DNA.
  61. John C. Polkinghorne (1930). British physicist. Anglican Priest. He was Professor of Mathematical Physics in Cambridge.
  62. George Ellis (1939). South African cosmologist. Quaker. Co-author of the book “The large-scale structure of space-time” with British physicist Stephen Hawking.
  63. George Gabriel Stokes (1819-1903). Irish mathematician and physicist. Anglican. He made great contributions to fluid dynamics, optics and mathematical physics.
  64. Mary Kenneth Keller (1914-1985). American computing scientist. Catholic religious. She was the first person to obtain a Doctorate in Computing and the first woman to obtain a doctorate in Computing.
  65. Franz Xaver Kugler (1862-1929). German chemist, mathematician and astronomer. Catholic and religious of the Society of Jesus. He was a scholar of Babylonian lunar and planetary astronomy.
  66. Robert James “Sam” Berry (1934). British geneticist and naturalist. Christian believer. He has been professor of genetics at University College London.
  67. José María Albareda (1902-1966). Spanish scientist. Catholic priest. Doctor in Pharmacy. He was the first secretary general of the Spanish Higher Council of Scientific Research (CSIC) and the first rector of the University of Navarra.
  68. Henry Baker Tristram (1822-1906). British naturalist, geologist and ornithologist. Anglican Priest. He explored the Sahara desert.
  69. Gregorio Marañón (1887-1960). Spanish physician and scientist. Catholic. He was the founder of endocrinology in Spain.
  70. George Salmon (1819-1904). Irish mathematician. Anglican. He made notable contributions to modern higher algebra.
  71. Laurent Lafforgue (1966). French mathematician. Catholic. He is the current director of the National Center for Scientific Research (CNRS) of France.
  72. César Nombela Cano (1946). Spanish scientist. Catholic. Specialist in microbiology and academic of number of the Real National Academy of Pharmacy, has presided over the Council of Scientific Investigations (CSIC) of Spain and at the moment is rector of the Menéndez Pelayo International University.
  73. Pierre Macq (1930-2013). Belgian physicist. Catholic. He did remarkable research in experimental nuclear physics. He worked at CERN and was the first lay rector of the Catholic University of Louvain.
  74. Maria Montessori (1870-1952). Italian physician, psychiatrist, biologist and psychologist. Catholic. She was the first Italian woman that doctoró in Medicine.
  75. Raoul Bott (1923-2005). Hungarian mathematician. Catholic. He made remarkable contributions to the field of geometry.
  76. Manuel Carreira (1931). Spanish Astrophysicist. Catholic priest. Member of the Vatican Observatory, he has collaborated with NASA on various projects.
  77. Henri Breuil (1877-1961). Naturalist, archaeologist and French geologist. Catholic. He was the pioneer of the study of the paleolithic art of the caves.
  78. Salvador Cervera (1935-2012). Spanish psychiatrist. Catholic. He was one of the great drivers of scientific psychiatry based on the biological foundations of mental illness.
  79. Jean Baptiste Carnoy (1836-1899). Belgian botanist, naturalist and mycologist. Catholic priest. He was the founder of cytology.
  80. Juan Martín Maldacena (1968). Argentine theoretical physicist. Catholic. He has made important studies of string theory and formulated the most realistic hypothesis on the holographic principle.
  81. Louis-Ovide Brunet (1826-1876). Canadian botanist. Catholic priest. He was the pioneer of botany in Canada.
  82. Piedad de la Cierva (1935-2012). Spanish scientist. Catholic. She was pioneer in the studies of the artificial radiation in Spain.
  83. Giuseppe Mercalli (1850-1914). Seismologist and Italian volcanologist. Catholic. He created the seismological scale that bears his name to evaluate the intensity of earthquakes.
  84. George Mary Searle (1839-1918). American astronomer. Catholic priest. He discovered six galaxies and the asteroid Pandora.
  85. Angelo Secchi (1818-1878). Italian astronomer. Catholic priest. Great expert in the study of the Sun, he discovered the spicules in the solar chromosphere a year before his death.
  86. William Thomson (1929). British physicist and mathematician. Protestant. He is one of the modernizers of physics. Developed the Kelvin temperature scale.
  87. Georg Cantor (1845-1918). Russian mathematician. Protestant. Inventor -together with Dededking and Frege- of set theory.
  88. Henrietta Swan Leavitt (1868-1921). American astronomer. Protestant. She discovered and cataloged the variable stars of the Magellanic Clouds.
  89. Donald Knuth (1938). American scientist. Protestant. He is one of the greatest experts in computer science.
  90. James Cullen (1867-1933). Irish mathematician. Catholic and religious of the Society of Jesus. He defined the natural numbers of Cullen.
  91. Julius Aloysius Arthur Nieuwland (1878-1936). Belgian chemist and botanist. Catholic priest. He is famous for his studies on acetylene and its application to make synthetic rubber, which would later lead to neoprene.
  92. Pierre Duhem (1908-1988). French physicist. Catholic. Expert in historical studies on medieval science. It was proposed twice for the Nobel Prize in Physics.
  93. Francis Collins (1950). American Genetist. Protestant. He has directed the Human Genome Project, with which the sequence of the human genome was discovered.
  94. José Agustín Pérez del Pulgar (1875-1939). Spanish physicist. Catholic priest. He specialized in electricity and mathematical physics. He founded the Higher Technical School of Engineering of the Pontifical University of Comillas.
  95. Antonio Romañá Pujó (1900-1981). Spanish mathematician. Catholic and religious of the Society of Jesus. Doctor in Exact Sciences, studied the effect-Earth in the solar activity, as well as the sunspots.
  96. Hippolyte Fizeau (1819-1896). Physicist and French astronomer. Catholic. He investigated the phenomena of the interference of light and the transmission of heat, and discovered together with Doppler the change of apparent frequency of the waves in relation to their observer.
  97. John Carew Eccles (1903-1997). Australian neurophysiologist. Catholic. He studied the transmission of signals between nerves and muscles.
  98. Antonino Zichichi (1929). Italian physicist. Catholic. One of the pioneers of nuclear physics, prolific author and award winner in several countries.
  99. James Clerk Maxwell (1831-1879). British mathematician. Protestant. He developed the classical electromagnetic theory and formulated the equations that bear his name.
  100. John Ambrose Fleming (1848-1945). British physicist and engineer. Protestant. It was one of the forerunners of electronics.

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